Archive for Schoolhouse Arts

Schoolhouse Arts Presents Chilling Mystery “AND THEN THERE WERE NONE”

Posted in Hot Off The Press with tags , , , , , on September 29, 2018 by Ringer

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September 2018

In the 1930s, it was the basement of the Old Standish High School.  In a parallel universe, also 1930s, it is an eerie isolated island estate off the coast of England where a group of unsuspecting guests are about to experience a daunting killing spree.

Schoolhouse Arts Center presents Agatha Christie’s AND THEN THERE WERE NONE—her best-selling novel and the world’s best-selling mystery—at its ever-improving multi-purpose performing arts campus in Standish.

Director Harlan Baker has assembled a fine cast and crew, highly effective in transforming the main theater space into a remote private domain built on rock, surrounded by cliffs and ocean waves, and far enough from the mainland where brutal murders and mayhem won’t be suspected, let alone prevented.

Eight guests are invited for different reasons to a gathering by Ulick Norman Owen and his wife, Una Nancy Owen.  They are welcomed by Thomas and Ethel Rogers (John Littlefield and Laura Ketchum), newly-hired butler and cook-housekeeper who have not met the hosts but have been asked to announce their late arrival.  As the guests become aquainted, they realize that none of them actually knows the Owens.

After supper, a mysterious gramophone recording describes individual murders perpetrated by each visitor who is also charged with escaping justice.  Fear runs high and suspicion abounds as Justice Wargrave figures out that “U.N. Owen” is shorthand for “Unknown,” at which point the first victim suddenly dies of cyanide poisoning.  One by one, guests are methodically killed off in accordance with the lines of a sinister nursery rhyme, “Ten Little Soldiers” that is prominently displayed as a wall hanging in the gathering room.  It becomes a race against time for the survivors to figure out “whodunit.”

Naturally, there’s a storm that wipes out the power, cutting off communication to the mainland and preventing any boats from reaching the island.  The droning sound of the ocean waves and candle-lit setting provide a nice atmosphere for chills and goosebumps to surface.

The characters are wonderfully quirky, well cast and well played:  Sophia Sturdee is Vera Claythorne, the efficient young secretary/ingenue; Zachariah Stearn brings righteous blend of animation, cockiness and nervous comic timing to his portrayal of Captain Phillip Lombard; Jerry Walker is fun as the aloof and reckless driver Anthony Marston; Barbara Levault is very believable as an elderly, religiously rigid spinster.

Tom Ferent is intense and impeccably commanding as retired Justice Lawrence Wargrave; Randy Hunt confidently handles the role of William Blore, a former police inspector and now a private investigator, a character who arouses skepticism after his initial introduction as “Davis” is unmasked; Ricky Brewster brings much emotion and animation to his role as a young Dr. William Armstrong.

Chalmers Hardenbergh is exquisite as General John MacArthur, a retired World War I war hero, now challenged with memory loss as he continues to search for his dead wife.  Hardenbergh is a consummate actor,  never out of character, whose finesse is especially noteworthy to observe when he’s not directly involved in a scene.

Within each well-crafted character is a deep-hidden secret.  What makes AND THEN THERE WERE NONE so engaging is the unescapable subliminal opportunity for the audience to play armchair detectives and put all the puzzle pieces together before it’s too late.

The set is awesome, well-dressed and appointed with period furniture and props, a collective effort by Colin Lemont, Zachariah Stearn, Francine Morin, Molly Lemont, Marissa Morissette, Ben Macri, Carol Morin, Jerry Walker and Neil Ruecker.

One would think—and hope—that even as the cast is significantly slashed (no pun intended), the remaining characters could figure out a way to stick together and avoid being plucked off by a mad killer.  Yet, one-by-one, the horrible deaths persist as the audience continues to guess who’s guilty…until, of course, the very end when they are proven wrong (at which point the audience is administered the Agatha Christie pledge to not reveal the culprit upon leaving the theater…sorry, you’ll have to see this spine-chilling thriller for yourself and make your own conclusions).

AND THEN THERE WERE NONE continues through October 6th –   Friday & Saturdays at 7:30 pm and Sundays at 2:00 pm.

Schoolhouse Arts Center is located at 16 Richville Rd., Standish.  FMI: 207/642-3743 or www.schoolhousearts.org.

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–Louis Philippe

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SCHOOLHOUSE ARTS SCORES WITH “SEUSSICAL THE MUSICAL”

Posted in Hot Off The Press with tags , , , on July 12, 2018 by Ringer

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July 2018

Schoolhouse Arts Center at Sebago Lake in Standish, Maine, commemorates the legacy of Dr. Seuss with its colorful, dazzling, high-energy summer production of SEUSSICAL THE MUSICAL, running now through July 29th.

Theodor Seuss Geisel, also known as Dr. Seuss, is undeniably one of the most famous authors of children’s literature whose works have influenced millions of children around the world.  With such a universal appeal, SEUSSICAL THE MUSICAL is a perfect summer blockbuster the entire family will enjoy

Once again, Director Zachariah Stearn puts his trademark production touches on a quintessential community theater formula:  Take a bunch of local actors, singers and dancers—newcomers and seasoned players alike—spanning six decades in age range with varying levels of stage skills.  Put your heart and soul into it and give the performers an amazing empowering experience and the audience a show they’ll never forget.

Contributing to the magic is Stearn’s hard-working creative team—Choreographer April Monte, Music Director Rachel Scala, Production Manager Sarah Reidy, Stage Manager Molly Lemont, Costumes by Chris Roberts and the tech crew.

Written by Tony Award winners Lynn Ahrens and Stephen Flaherty, SEUSSICAL THE MUSICAL brings to life the favorite Seuss characters and weaves them through a story-line that incorporates over a dozen famous Seuss tales.  One thing this show is not is logical…but perhaps that’s the point.

Joy Lemont is a purrfect Cat in The Hat, the ever-present effervescent emcee who unravels the journey with a strong, playful presence mixed with mischief, razzle-dazzle and imagination.  She leads Jojo (well performed by Emily Paruk) and the cast on the journey to the Jungle of Nool, where we find Horton the Elephant (cleverly played by a subtly-nuanced TJ Scannell).

The jungle creatures are delightful and wonderfully animated:  Gertrude McFuzz (Meghan Reidy), Mayzie LaBird (Katherine Lind), Sour Kangaroo (Emily Libby), Young Kangaroo (Lucy Ayn Stretch), A chorus of Bird Girls (Emily Thompson, Anika Malia, Hannah Macri, Maddie Hancock, Cailyn Wheeler and Meghan Reidy) and a band of delinquent monkeys known as the Wickersham Brothers (Jake Clowes, Sam D’Amico, Zach Pierce, Will Searway, Alex Tukey and Jeff McNally).

Meanwhile, in a parallel universe is the land of Whoville, a world of little people which Horton imagined after hearing voices from a speck of dust he discovered.  This is the story Cat in the Hat pushed Jojo in, to be the son of the Mayor and Mrs. Mayor of Whoville (a seriously funny couple of loving parents played by Colin and Joellen Lemont).  Because Jojo gets in trouble with her “thinks,” he has been sent off to a military school run by General Genghis Khan Schmitz (played righteously over-the-top by Jake Clowes).

The Whos also include Cindy Smith, Christine Wolf, John Littlefield, Emily Lemont, Annikka Moccioloa, Liam Doran and Mylo Brann.  Little Whos/Cadets are played by Lucy Ayn Stretch, Elizabeth Hancock, Joshua Lemont, Sephine Seal, Jayson Seal and Becca Macri.

Oodles of rapidly-developing conflicts and challenges abound between the Jungle of Nool and Whoville, and “thinks” don’t get resolved before Horton is sold to the traveling Circus McGurkus, then freed by Gertrude, returned to the Jungle where he is put on trial for talking to a speck, disturbing the peace and loitering on an egg, and sentenced to the Nool Asylum for the Criminally Insane (I told you it wasn’t logical). The dust speck, home of Whoville, is ordered destroyed but Jojo uses his “thinks” and saves the planet, and a happy ending is enjoyed by all.

SEUSSICAL THE MUSICAL is exciting and engaging, loaded with creative movement and lots of visual and audio surprises.  But above all it’s a musical—an operetta at that—which makes this production even more significant of an accomplishment.

Music Director Rachel Scala cultivated some excellent individual and choral voices with nicely defined harmonies and a good overall presentation that’ll proliferate with each show.

The songs are wonderful, with the Seuss brand of catchy lyrics, memorable phrases and rhythmic patterns:  “Horton Hears A Who (A person is a person no matter how small),” “It’s Possible,” “How Lucky You Are,” “Oh The Thinks You Can Think” and so many more.  The group production numbers are quite appealing.  Most compelling was the beautiful mesmerizing lullaby about a magical place called “Solla Sollew.”

In addition to Scala on keyboard, the pit includes Gabrielle Valle on piano, Eric Landeau on drums, Rosalind Goodrich and Noah Hall on trumpet, and Christopher Petersen, Brenna Ryder, Kim Mathieu and Sam D’Amico on reeds.

What might be ambiguous in the product is abundantly clear in the process.  It’s a Schoolhouse thing, a magnificent thing, a Beebe legacy.  As espoused by Dr. Seuss, the goal was to engage young people, help them unlock their imaginations, giving them many perspectives to “thinks” they experience every day, making it enjoyable to learn and teaching valuable lessons along the way.  Mission accomplished!

Schoolhouse Arts Center is located at 16 Richville Rd., Standish.  Show times are Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays at 7 PM and Sundays at 5 PM.  FMI:  (207) 642-3743 or www.schoolhousearts.org.

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–Louis Philippe

Schoolhouse Arts Center Soars With PETER PAN

Posted in Hot Off The Press with tags , , , , on July 14, 2017 by Ringer

 

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July 2017

One of my favorite songs of all time is Liza Minnelli’s magical trademark rendition of “Never Never Land” from her Liza’s Back Live Concert CD released in 2002.  But for bits and pieces, I had never seen PETER PAN, the musical from which the song was born…that is, until now.  I’m glad to report that my first journey to Never Land was a wonderful experience.

Schoolhouse Arts Center at Sebago Lake presents PETER PAN in its full splendor through July 30th.  This is the classic tale by Sir James M. Barrie that spawned the 1954 Broadway musical that starred Mary Martin in the iconic lead role.  With music by Mark Charlap and Jule Styne and lyrics by Carolyn Leigh, Betty Comden and Adolph Green, this timeless tale marks the directorial debut by Zachariah Stearn, himself a Schoolhouse icon, who effectively creates a fun, exciting adventure for audience members of all ages.

The journey to Never Land begins in the nursery of the Darling home (Scene 1).  While Mr. and Mrs. Darling (Steven Koskinen and Cindy Smith) are out for the evening and the children Wendy (Ashley McBreairty), John (Reese Madarasz) and Michael (Ella Tedeschi) are asleep, Peter Pan (Kaylin Brown) makes his grand entrance in search of his shadow, with the help of his fairy, Tinkerbell.  The children are enthralled by Peter Pan who teaches them to fly and invites them to come to his home, Never Land, where he lives with the Lost Boys…and off they go.

Like Oz and Narnia, Never Land (Scene 2) is enchanting, blithe, ever-imaginative, forever young, with forests abundant in adventures.  But the Lost Boys face challenges from Tiger Lily (Emily Thompson) and her tribe of Indian Braves and Captain Hook (Steven Koskinen) and his band of Pirates.  As amazing as Never Land is, before long, the children wish to return to their home but they and the Boys are captured by Hook’s Pirates and trapped aboard the Jolly Roger (Scene 3).  With some fateful twists and climatic surprises, thanks to Peter Pan, all ends well.

The large mixed cast of 34 actors, singers and dancers is a nice representation of the Schoolhouse community talent pool that includes all ages, cross-genre roles, and all levels of experience from the newbies to seasoned pros.

Despite some tentative moments early on, the cast quickly found a creative flow that was infectious and delightful.  Clearly, Director Stearn’s vision “to create a production filled with childlike wonder and innocence, with big colorful characters,” was a message heard loud and clear.

The best moments are the larger group scenes which provide entertaining animation by actors confident in their characters.  The Pirates are visually vibrant, each with unique eccentricities that bring comic relief and joy to their scenes.  Steven Koskinen (Captain Hook) is outstanding with his expression and timing and Schoolhouse favorites Jeffrey McNally (Smee) and Jacob Clowes (Noodler) do not fail to deliver their usual high-energy top-notch game.

Other Pirates include Janet Littlefield (Cecco), Jack Lamont (Jukes), Cindy Smith (Smitty), John Littlefield (Starkey), Timothy Dwyer (Timbo) and Airin Wolf (Mullins)—all worthy players.

Emily Thompson owns the stage in her role as Tiger Lily, displaying grace and competence with her dancing skills and leading a highly-qualified tribe of Indian Braves that include Gabrielle Bouthot, Sophia Cartonio, Alexis Clement, Cara Kennedy, Pauline Kennedy, Annikka Mocciola, Meghan Reidy and Melissa Spicer.

Kaylin Brown (Peter Pan) and Ashley McBreairty (Wendy) soar in their leading roles (pardon the pun).  Both possess nicely controlled, pristine singing voices and clear diction (though a tad more projection couldn’t hurt).  They’re capable of driving their scenes with their instinctive blend of magical innocence and naïve wisdom.

The songs are stellar and well delivered by leads and chorus alike and will certainly be on the lips of audience members for days after the curtain call.  “I’ve Gotta Grow,” “I’m Flying,” “Never Never Land,” “I Won’t Grow Up,” are just a few favorites.  The music is under the capable direction of Allen Thomas.

Schoolhouse Arts Center is “old school”—literally.  It’s a charming venue with creaky wooden floors, old-fashioned bathrooms, classrooms that are now lobby space.  It is the very essence of Maine community theater with a bonus rustic feel in the heat of summer.  It might not be state-of-the-art but Schoolhouse is the ultimate “state of the heart” theater group that specializes in the process of performing arts versus the slickness of the product.

At Schoolhouse, there’s a noticeable casualness before the show begins, perhaps bursts of controlled chaos (cast members frantically searching for their props, or scooting across the stage to deliver a message, or simply appearing in full costume to say hi to their family).

Process-vs-Product— it’s a beautiful thing.   Director Stearn gets it.  Those few tentative moments in the action when actors are faced with a momentary crisis (“Am I waiting for the band or are they waiting for me?” “What should I do for these four measures?” “Oops, was I supposed to come out yet?” “Is that crocodile stuck?”) are precious and scary moments that lead to personal victory and empowerment.  Schoolhouse founders Hank and Nancy Beebe understood that philosophy and would be very proud of the PETER PAN cast and crew.

Schoolhouse’s choice to stage PETER PAN was a bold one that falls between two factors, i.e, the (left brain) funding required for aesthetic changes to the stage, liability, safety issues and equipment installation to “fly” castmembers versus the (right brain) potential payoff for having that creative wow factor of castmembers “flying.”  Cudos to the Board for the decision to “fly.”

PETER PAN runs through July 30th, Thursdays – Saturdays at 7 PM, and Sundays at 5 PM.  Schoolhouse Arts Center is located at 16 Richville Rd., Standish (near the intersection of Routes 35 and 114).  For reservations, call 207/642-3743 or visit www.schoolhousearts.org.

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–Louis Philippe

SCHOOLHOUSE ARTS PRESENTS CLASSIC COMEDY “PLAZA SUITE”

Posted in Hot Off The Press with tags , , , , , on April 21, 2017 by Ringer

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April 2017

Ever check into a hotel and wonder who stayed there last night?  Last month?  Last year?  Was it a single person?  Married couple?  Family? And just what occurred in that very same space you’re now occupying?

Playwright Neil Simon provides some answers in his classic comedy PLAZA SUITE, now playing at Schoolhouse Arts in StandishWith Simon’s unique trademark style of situation humor, PLAZA SUITE offers an inside look at three parties who at one time or another stayed at NYC’s Plaza Hotel for very different reasons.  It’s a snapshot in time of quirky characters with idiosyncratic personalities on zany, fragmented journeys that all intersect in Suite 719.

Act One.  Sam and Karen Nash are celebrating their “23rd or 24th” anniversary “today or tomorrow.”  Despite Karen’s desire to rekindle the romance by revisiting their honeymoon suite, Sam’s desire is focused on work, work, work.  Just when tensions are boiling, Jean McCormack, Nash’s young, skinny and attractive secretary, drops by with more work that compels Sam back to the office.   Karen’s joking reference to an affair between Sam and Jean turns out to be true.

Terri Plummer’s Karen and Chris Roberts’ Sam are wonderful to watch as they navigate all the emotional landmines through incessant roller-coaster rides of nice-talk and heated arguments.  The strengths and weaknesses of their characters are manipulated perfectly by Plummer and Roberts, never letting up on the push-and-pull, up-and-down, ying-yang, internal conflicts.  Crickett Cote’s brief portrayal of Jean McCormack is subtly well-played.

Act Two.  Hollywood Producer (and legendary ladies man) Jesse Kiplinger is in town and hopes to hook up with his old high school flame Muriel Tate after 17 years.  Muriel, now married with children, is guilt-ridden but reluctantly accepts Jesse’s invitation to visit and promises she will not stay long.  After a drink or two or 10, Jesse reveals his inner feelings about his work, fame, past relationships and his love for Muriel, who admits to her unhappy marriage and by now has poured out her heart and soul on her way to passing out in bed.

Gerald Davis, though perhaps a tad young for the role, is ultimately convincing as Jesse Kiplinger.  He is strong as the self-absorbed purveyor of fame and fortune, knows how to display the precise amount of inner anger, and gently reveals his character’s vulnerability.  Mia Perron is both fun and funny as Muriel Tate, aptly handling a wide range of emotion as she successfully transforms Muriel from a shy, demure, proper young lady into a wilder and willing partner.  Together, the facial expressions and comedic timing are entertaining.

Act Three.  Sixty-eight guests and a bridegroom are anxiously waiting downstairs for Roy and Norma Hubley to escort Mimsey, their daughter and bride-to-be.  Only problem is Mimsey has locked herself in the bathroom.  Hilarity ensues as the frantic parents, desperate and under pressure with each passing moment, try everything under the sun to get their daughter out.  But out of blame, excuses and time, Mom and Dad, bruised and defeated, torn and tattered, have no choice but to tell the groom, Borden Eisler, the wedding is off.  Borden  comes to the room and immediately and effortlessly gets Mimsey to come out.  The wedding is back on.

This is the mad-cap pièce de résistance of all three acts, with more outward slapstick and farce, and Teresa Dyer (Norma) and Tom Ferrent (Roy) capably and comfortably achieving their creative tasks.  They work well with each other, and against each other, and instinctively flow from moments of comic hysteria to moments of subtle silence.  Rachel Scala plays Mimsey.

Honorable mention is due for Jon Bolduc’s dual-role as the waiter in Act One and Borden Eisler in Act Three.

Overall, PLAZA SUITE is comfort food for theater goers.  It’s nothing fancy, high-tech, psycho-analytical, political or dramatically intense.  It’s just a fun time with a good comedy courtesy of Neil Simon, Director Jerry Walker, and a nice bunch of Maine talent.

PLAZA SUITE runs April 21-May 7, Friday & Saturdays at 7:30 pm and Sundays at 2:00 pm.  Schoolhouse Arts Center is located at 16 Richville Rd., Standish.  FMI: 207/642-3743 or www.schoolhousearts.org.

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–Louis Philippe